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**Salt Lake Tribune: 2 Schools for autism—825 kids on waiting list–BUT IT’S NO BIG DEAL…

Aug 20

 Because I’m a history teacher, I try to find comparable situations from the past….times when a  society was being overwhelmed by powerful forces….
A story like this makes me think about the sack of Rome in 410 by the Visigoths.   

The barbarians are like autism—the numbers keep getting worse and worse and we do nothing.  I posted a comment.  I’m not sure why I even bothered.  The information in this story spells a disaster for Utah.  STILL, the reporter who wrote this isn’t concerned.  Building whole schools for autism?   Hundreds on the waiting lists? 
Where are these kids coming from?  When is it going to stop?  Where are all the adults like this?  Obviously the Salt Lake Tribune doesn’t want to get into what’s really happening here. 
If doctors and health officials are copacetic with this….shouldn’t we all be?
New Utah charter school for kids with autism opens doors

Pleasant Grove . The first day of school at Spectrum Academy on Tuesday looked slightly different from others around the state.

Sure, kids bounced through hallways toting new backpacks as teachers herded them into classrooms.

But in many of those rooms, the lights stayed off to help keep students calmer. Youngsters fiddled with foam blocks or balls of clay to help them focus. Some flapped their hands, and others carried headphones to muffle sharp noises.

“It’s a place where the kids can feel safe,” said teacher Brooke Armijo of the charter school’s new Pleasant Grove campus, which opened Tuesday.

The school is one of the few of its kind in Utah and the nation – a free public school serving kids with autism. The school first opened in North Salt Lake in 2006 and has since seen huge demand. This year, school leaders opened the Pleasant Grove campus to about 430 pupils in grades K-8, hoping to ease some pressure in North Salt Lake.

But demand has surged. The North Salt Lake campus has a waiting list of about 675 students, and the new Pleasant Grove school already has about 150 on its waiting list, said Brad Nelson, Spectrum director of development and finance.

Students were accepted to the new campus on a first-come-first-serve basis. Next year, a lottery will likely be held.

The demand perhaps isn’t surprising in a state where one in 54 children have been identified as having an autism spectrum disorder. Utah has private schools serving children with autism, and regular public schools serve such kids as well, but the Spectrum campuses are the only public schools in the state specifically dedicated to the cause, school officials say….

About 80 percent of the students are considered special education, Christensen said. Some are not, but were enrolled because they have siblings at the school, didn’t fit in at their regular schools or have other issues, she said. As a public school, Spectrum can’t pick and choose whom to accept, but she estimates about 70 percent of the pupils have autism.

 

Sarasota (FL) Herald-Tribune: Autism: Then and now

Aug 19

“Then and now”?  The only difference between THEN and NOW is that a once rare disorder has turned into a worldwide EPIDEMIC.  Doctors still have no answers.  Children still inexplicably end up on the spectrum. 
 Mike Schwanz’s mother: ‘I slowly watched him die before my eyes.’  Sadly, forty years later, it’s still happening and doctors and health officials just don’t care.

Mike Schwanz, the youngest of three boys, was fine until he was 18 months old. Then he started exhibiting strange behaviors.

He would go to a lamp, twist the bulb and look at his fingers for a long time.

Short sentences he already knew how to say, like “Tie my shoes,” condensed to “Tie shoes.” Soon, he quit using words altogether and would just stand there, staring at his mother.

The story will sound familiar to any parent of a child on the autism spectrum – now one in every 68 children in the United States. But Mike’s sudden transformation came in 1977, and his mother was at a loss.

When the Bradenton boy was diagnosed with autism, one in 10,000 children were identified with some form of the disorder that affects the brain’s normal development of social and communication skills in the first three years of life.

Comment:

Something is  missing in this story.  WHY did Mike Schwanz begin to regress into autism at 18 months?  WHY have the numbers gone from one in 10,000 to one in every 68 children in the U.S., one in 42 among boys alone?  Health officials and mainstream medicine can’t tell us.  Experts at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have shown little interest in autism.  They’ve never even called it a “crisis.”  Officially, autism has no known cause or cure.  There is nothing a mother like Judy can do to prevent a sudden loss of learned skills and descent into autism.  HOW BAD DO THE NUMBERS HAVE TO GET? 

When Mike Schwanz developed autism, most people had never heard of the disorder.  Today everyone knows someone with an affected child.  WHY?  In the next 10 years, 500,000 young adults with autism will be leaving school and as adults, they’ll be dependent on the taxpayers for their support and care.  Maybe when that happens, we’ll finally address autism as the health care emergency that it clearly is.

Thomas Frieden tells doctors how to talk parents into the HPV vaccine for their children

Aug 19

Incredible promo that makes Dr. Frieden sound more like he’s a Merck rep.  This same official has never showed this kind of interest in addressing what autism is doing to our children.  Notice the fleeting reference to safety as a concern and the blanket recommendation that “ALL PRETEENS” get this vaccine.  This vaccine has only been on the  market FOR FIVE YEARS.  How can Frieden make the claim that it PREVENTS CERVICAL CANCER?
Aug 18, 2014, Protect the Next Generation: Recommend the HPV Vaccine
The HPV vaccine is safe and effective, and it prevents cancer. The vaccine works, even better than we had hoped. How often can we say we have something that we know can protect the next generation against cancer? Twenty-seven thousand HPV-related cancers are diagnosed every year in the United States and HPV vaccination could prevent most of them. …

I’m asking pediatric and family medicine clinicians to strengthen your recommendations. You can eliminate missed opportunities. You can recommend and administer the HPV vaccine to all preteens during the same visit that you recommend and administer the Tdap and meningococcal vaccines.

The best way to do this is to give a bundled recommendation for all three of these vaccines without singling out HPV vaccine. Reviewing vaccination status at every healthcare visit can also help reduce missed opportunities. And you can use electronic medical records or registry systems to set up reminders to recommend the vaccines that your preteen patients need.

**Ebola breakout coincided with UN vaccine campaigns

Aug 19

Aug 12, 2014

The ebola pandemic began in late February in the former French colony of Guinea while UN agencies were conducting nationwide vaccine campaigns for three other diseases in rural districts. The simultaneous eruptions of this filovirus virus in widely separated zones strongly suggests that the virulent Zaire ebola strain (ZEBOV) was deliberately introduced to test an antidote in secret trials on unsuspecting humans.

The cross-border escape of ebola into neighboring Sierra Leone and Liberia indicates something went terribly wrong during the illegal clinical trials by a major pharmaceutical company. Through the lens darkly, the release of ebola may well have been an act biowarfare in the post-colonial struggle to control mineral-rich West Africa

Earlier this year, rural residents eagerly stood in line to receive vaccinations from foreign-funded medical programs. Since the cover-up of the initial outbreak, however, panicked West Africans rural folk are terrified of any treatment from international aid programs for fear of a rumored genocide campaign. The mass hysteria is also fueled in a region traditionally targeted by Western pedophiles by the fact that filovirus survives longer in semen than in other body fluids, a point that resulted in murderous attacks on young men believed to be homosexuals. Ebola detonated fear and loathing, and perhaps that is exactly the intended objective of a destabilization strategy.

This ongoing series of investigative journalism reports on the ebola crisis exposes how West Africans are largely justified in their distrust of the Western aid agencies that unleashed, whether by mistake or deliberate intent, the most virulent virus known to man. . . . .

Video: Vaccine safety whistleblower at CDC

Aug 19

 Dr. Andrew Wakefield and Dr. Brian Hooker and the smoking gun.

Senior government scientist breaks 13 years of silence on CDC’s vaccine-autism fraud

 
“Oh my God.  I cannot believe we did what we did, but we did.”
Dr. Andrew Wakefield:
“This is a real story of a real fraud.  …Deliberate.  High-level deception of the American people with disastrous consequences for its children’s health. …
(Dr. Wakefield then described the inhumane treatment of black American man during the Tuskegee syphilis experiment that was conducted from 1932 to 1972.)
“Thirty years later the CDC was to do something arguably far worse. Over a decade ago, Dr. Scott Montgomery and I put forward a hypothesis for MMR vaccine and autism: the age you receive the vaccine influences the risk. …We shared this hypothesis with vaccine officials, members of the Centers for Disease Control, at meetings in Washington, D.C. and Cold Spring Harbor.  A group of senior vaccine safety people at the CDC studied it.  It panned out.  We were right–at least partly. 
“By Nov 9, 2001, nearly thirteen years ago, senior CDC scientists knew that the younger age exposure to MMR was associated with an increased risk of autism.  In 2004 they published, but they hid the results. …
“MMR was declared safe.” 
Dr. Coleen Boyle was shown testifying for the CDC in a Congressional hearing in 2013 denying a link between vaccines and autism. 
Wakefield: “What Dr. Coleen Boyle…did not tell Congress is that she and her colleagues had deliberately concealed the autism-vaccine link from the Institute of Medicine and the public.  Ironically, they even received an award from the Secretary of Health and Human Services for this work. 

“So troubling was this fraud that one of CDC researchers broke ranks.  Eventually he made contact with Dr. Brian Hooker, father of a vaccine-injured child with autism and a vaccine researcher.  …
 Dr. Hooker and the muffled voice of the CDC scientist was included next.  Hooker said that a great of information showing “fraud and malfeasance” on the part of the CDC was revealed to him by the whistleblower. 
Wakefield: “From their own data sheets dated 2001, Dr. Hooker analyzed that CDC’s results and he found the same risk for autism that the CDC scientists had themselves identified.  …
“This week, August 10, 2014, Dr. Hooker published the real findings.  A 340 percent increased risk of autism in boys receiving the MMR on time compared with those receiving it later. 
 
“Thirteen years and tens of thousands of children later. 
“As I’ve said, Dr. Montgomery and I were only partly right.  The risk of autism from early MMR vaccination was seen in black children, black boys.  Those boys, for some reason are at very high risk. 
“Consistent with the CDC’s own findings, the rate of autistic regression in black children is reported to be twice that in white children.  …
Scientist Dr. David Lewis, an international expert in whistleblowing and the detection of scientific fraud, reviewed the original CDC documents and the paper they published in 2004.”
Dr. David Lewis: “Probably this is the clearest case and the easiest case in which to answer, is it fraud or is it an accident?  Is it just an artifact of the study that we’re dealing with here?  Clearly it’s fraud.”
Dr. Hooker talking about the CDC whistleblower: “He knows that he’s culpable for damage.  He knows that he’s culpable for permanent damage of a large significant portion of the population of the United States.”
Muffled voice of the whistleblower: “The higher-ups wanted to do certain things and I went along with it.”
Dr. Wakefield: “Dr. Frank DeStefano, Dr. Marshalyn Yeargin-Allsop, Dr. Coleen Boyle–they knew.  They let it happen and they could have stopped it. 
“Michigan lawyer Allison Folmar, an award-winning advocate for children and parental rights, gave her reaction.”
Allison Folmar: “I feel first and foremost, as a human being, betrayed.  When you lose your faith and trust in humanity, how do you repair it?  I really don’t know what to say, to be honest.”
Dr. Hooker: “He’s very regretful about his involvement.”
Whistleblower: “It was the lowest point in my career that I went along with that paper.  I’m not going to lie.  I basically have stopped lying. 

Dr. Wakefield: “You see, vile as the crimes of Stalin, Pol Pot and Hitler were, these men were not hypocrites….  These men were not entrusted with the welfare of their victims.  Their mottos did not include the words, ‘To save lives and protect.’  They were not running a mandatory program disguised as caring.
“How many children?  How many went to the wall in that decade of silence?  How many Presidents, Mr. Obama?” 

Media announces rise in children with disabilities–but it’s nothing to worry about

Aug 19

Officials are busy pretending to care about what’s happening to our children at the same time they’re adamant that nothing’s wrong.  On the same day as the “first global autism study” was announced showing that there’s been no increase in autism over the last 20 years and adults are affected at the same rate as children, this news is announced. 
 
It’s a 10 year study (2000-2011) involving 200,000 children.  I’m sure it’s intended to look impressive and extensive–meanwhile, it tells us nothing. 
 
It’s about the increase in developmental disorders (21 percent) that’s been found.  We’re told that no one was looking specifically at autism.  WHY?  Because in 2000, when the study began, autism wasn’t such a prominent condition.
 
Over and over we’re told that “more awareness” is behind the rise.  Notice this 21 percent increase is describe as having “slightly increased.”  Autism is talked about without anyone noting that in 2012 it was announced that autism alone had increased 78 percent over the past decade.  No one could explain that either.  No one was worried and no one really cared.

Disabilities among U.S. children have increased slightly, with a bigger rise in mental and developmental problems in those from wealthier families, a 10-year analysis found.The increases may partly reflect more awareness and recognition that conditions, including autism, require a specific diagnosis to receive special services, the researchers say….

The study is the first to look broadly at the 10-year trend, but the results echo previous studies showing increases in autism, attention problems and other developmental or mental disabilities….

The trend was fueled by increases in attention problems, speech problems, and other mental or developmental disorders that likely include autism, although that condition isn’t identified in the analyzed data.

Some Pennsylvania researchers say childhood disability rates are the highest ever recorded. The study from Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh shows physical disabilities dropped by about 12 percent, but disabilities related to brain development or mental health rose nearly 21 percent, in the past decade.Doctors  from Children’s Hospital studied data from the Centers for Disease Control, gathered between 2001 and 2011, evaluating children’s ability to perform activities at home and school.

Children living in poverty have the highest rates of disability, but the study showed more a 28.4 percent increase in disabilities among kids in higher income families. … “My feeling is the problem has been there, but right now,  maybe in the last ten years, we are more aware of it and we get more help from schools and daycare and it  helps to diagnose this kind of disability,” Dr. Younes explains.

Dr Younes says the biggest increase has been in autism diagnoses, but he’s also seen a rise in the number children with ADHD. He says other brain development and mental health issues have remained steady.

Dr. Younes believes it’s important to now look for the reasons why these disabilities are so prevalent.

Researchers say disadvantaged kids still bear a disproportionate burden and that the increases may partly reflect more awareness and recognition that conditions, including autism, require a specific diagnosis to receive special services. Overall, disabilities of any kind affected 8 percent of children by 2010-2011, compared to close to 7 percent a decade earlier. For children living in poverty, the rate was 10 percent, versus about 6 percent of kids from wealthy families.
The trend was fueled by a spike in attention problems, speech problems, and developmental disorders like autism.

Dr. Kenneth Norwood, a developmental pediatrician in Charlottesville, Virginia, said the developmental disability increases echo what he sees in his medical practice, according to The Blaze (Italics).

“I’m routinely backed up six months for new patients,” said Norwood, chairman of the American Academy of Pediatrics’ Council on Children with Disabilities.

The increases may partly reflect more awareness and recognition that conditions, including autism, require a specific diagnosis to receive special services, the researchers say….

The researchers studied parents’ responses about children from birth through age 17 gathered in government-conducted health surveys from 2000 to 2011. Parents were asked about disabilities including chronic conditions such as hearing or vision problems; bone or muscle ailments; and mental, behavioral or developmental problems that limited kids’ physical abilities or required them to receive early behavioral intervention or special educational services. Nearly 200,000 children were involved.

 
“I’m routinely backed up six months for new patients,” said Norwood, chairman of the American Academy of Pediatrics’ Council on Children with Disabilities.

Norwood thinks there is more awareness of these conditions and that some, including autism, are truly rising in prevalence. Autism is thought to result from genetic flaws interacting with many other factors. Some studies have suggested these may include parents’ age and prenatal infections.

Disability due to any physical condition, such as asthma and breathing conditions, hearing problems, and bone or joint problems, declined by 12% during the decade, while cases related to any neurodevelopmental or mental-health condition, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), learning disabilities or emotional problems, increased by 21%….
 
Autism was not one of the 14 conditions of disability included in the NHIS dataset analyzed because it was established long before autism was widely recognized, Houtrow explains. “But we know from other research that the number of kids with a diagnosis of autism is increasing. We think we are capturing (them) in categories for ‘other developmental problems’ or ‘other mental, emotional and behavior problems,’ or ‘intellectual disabilities.’ “…

According to the most recent CDC report, 1 in 68 kids has been identified with an autism spectrum disorder, up from an estimated 1 in 88 in 2012 and 1 in 150 in 2007, “so most definitely” autism cases are a factor in the trend reported in this study, says Steven Pastyrnak, chief of pediatric psychology at Helen DeVos Children’s Hospital in Grand Rapids, Mich. He was not involved in the new research.

“And for higher socioeconomic-status families, there’s a growing acceptance to seek out help for their child, both at school and at an outpatient setting” for this condition, Pastyrnak says. “That’s why I think you see that increase so significantly.”

The number of children dealing with physical disabilities in the United States has declined by about 12 percent over the past decade. However, throughout the same time frame, the number of children dealing with neurodevelopmental or mental health problems has increased by nearly 21 percent.
A new study that will be published in the September issue of Pediatrics confirmed the findings, showing that in 2011, close to 6 million children in the United States were living with a disability…
Though researchers are not entirely certain what factors are responsible for the increase,  according to Houtrow, less stigma surrounding mental health conditions and more parental awareness regarding their child’s condition could have influenced responses that helped document the findings.

On a similar note, she also found that an increased awareness of autism has likely contributed to the increase.

“Decades ago, a child might have had substantial cognitive disabilities and abnormal behaviors that didn’t get diagnosed as something specific, and now that we’re understanding the neurobiology around autism, more children are being classified that way,” she concluded, according to Medscape..

Over the past half century, the prevalence of childhood disabilities in the United States has been on the rise, possibly due to an increased awareness about these issues. Now a study published in this week’s online issue of Pediatrics suggests the nature of those newly diagnosed disabilities is changing.

Houtrow hopes the study’s findings will open up further investigation into why these trends are happening. The authors concluded that documenting these changes in childhood disabilities is a positive step in developing better prevention methods, and treatments and services for these children.

“I think it’s a call to action,” said Houtrow. “It’s a call to action to the health care system and a call for additional research. And it’s a call to action to parents to be concerned about their child’s development. … Healthy children grow up to be healthy adults. Knowing how to better treat our younger generation is important to this country’s future.”

 

“We know that disabilities have been on the rise for decades,” Houtrow said. Understanding the trends helps practitioners know where and how to better direct services, the study noted….

Significant increases were reported in “other mental, emotional or behavioral problems,” which rose 65 percent, and speech problems and mental retardation, each up 63 percent, Houtrow said.

While ADHD increased 22 percent, according to parent reports, learning disabilities dropped 13 percent, the investigators found….

While there is still some stigma linked with disability, she said, the focus needs to be on understanding a child’s limitation and making plans to overcome it.

“The disability doesn’t just describe the limitation,” she said. “It affects the [child's] interaction with the world.”

Acknowledging it and making a plan, she said, “is better than ignoring it.”

Lead author Amy Houtrow, MD, PhD, MPH, from the Departments of Physical Medicine and Pediatrics, University of Pittsburgh in Pennsylvania, said that although the study was not designed to determine the reasons for the increase, the authors suspect from the parents’ reports that some of the drivers include less stigma associated with mental health conditions, more awareness of disorders by parents and physicians, and more willingness by physicians to diagnose conditions.

Dr. Houtrow told Medscape Medical News that willingness to diagnose may be even greater for advantaged families (those with 2-parent households and higher education and income levels), who may push harder to get services and may be perceived by the physician as more persuasive.

“To get certain services in the school or community, you have to have a diagnosis…. From a parent standpoint, it’s beneficial to get your kid services,” she said.

More Autism Classifications

She added that awareness of autism also likely is contributing to the increase.

“Decades ago, a child might have had substantial cognitive disabilities and abnormal behaviors that didn’t get diagnosed as something specific, and now that we’re understanding the neurobiology around autism, more children are being classified that way,” she said.

Diagnoses of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder are also on the rise, which may be pushing up the numbers because school-related difficulties would qualify children with the disorder under the parameters of disability, she said.

According to the most recent CDC report, 1 in 68 kids has been identified with an autism spectrum disorder, up from an estimated 1 in 88 in 2012 and 1 in 150 in 2007, “so most definitely” autism cases are a factor in the trend reported in this study, says Steven Pastyrnak, chief of pediatric psychology at Helen DeVos Children’s Hospital in Grand Rapids. He was not involved in the new research.

“And for higher socioeconomic-status families, there’s a growing acceptance to seek out help for their child, both at school and at an outpatient setting” for this condition, Pastyrnak says. “That’s why I think you see that increase so significantly.”

The overall increase in childhood disability was found for all age groups and genders and among children of black, white and Hispanic origin.

 The study is the first to look broadly at the 10-year trend but the results echo previous studies showing increases in autism, attention problems and other developmental or mental disabilities. It also has long been known that the disadvantaged are more likely to have chronic health problems and lack of access to good health care, which both can contribute to disabilities.
 
…The trend was fueled by increases in attention problems, speech problems and other mental or developmental disorders that likely include autism although that condition isn’t identified in the analyzed data.
Autism spectrum disorders, now thought to affect one in 68 U.S. children, was not one of the specific developmental disorders that parents could report. “Autism probably would have been listed by the parent as either ‘other developmental problem,’ ‘other mental, emotional or behavioral problem’ or ‘intellectual disability’ (also referred to as mental retardation),” Houtrow said.
Awareness of autism is likely contributing to the increase
Steven Pastyrnak, chief of pediatric psychology at Helen DeVos Children’s Hospital in Grand Rapids, MI, who was not a part of the study, added, “For higher socioeconomic-status families, there’s a growing acceptance to seek out help for their child, both at school and at an outpatient setting…That’s why I think you see that increase so significantly.”
Among those reasons is an increased openness about disabilities and increases in the rates of autism and attention deficit disorder, Houtrow said. The decline in reported physical limitations associated with asthma, a breathing problem related to constriction of the lung vessels, was likely the result of more effective medications that have been marketed to treat the disease, she said. 
 Houtrow said her discovery does not necessarily mean impairments are proliferating more rapidly for higher-income families. Instead, she said, it could reflect better awareness, detection and services for those with easier access to health care. 

Officials are busy pretending to care about what’s happening to our children at the same time they’re adamant that nothing’s wrong.  On the same day as the “first global autism study” was announced showing that there’s been no increase in autism over the last 20 years and adults are affected at the same rate as children, this news is announced. 
 
It’s a 10 year study (2000-2011) involving 200,000 children.  I’m sure it’s intended to look impressive and extensive–meanwhile, it tells us nothing. 
 
It’s about the increase in developmental disorders (21 percent) that’s been found.  We’re told that no one was looking specifically at autism.  WHY?  Because in 2000, when the study began, autism wasn’t such a prominent condition.
 
Over and over we’re told that “more awareness” is behind the rise.  Notice this 21 percent increase is describe as having “slightly increased.”  Autism is talked about without anyone noting that in 2012 it was announced that autism alone had increased 78 percent over the past decade.  No one could explain that either.  No one was worried and no one really cared.

Disabilities among U.S. children have increased slightly, with a bigger rise in mental and developmental problems in those from wealthier families, a 10-year analysis found.The increases may partly reflect more awareness and recognition that conditions, including autism, require a specific diagnosis to receive special services, the researchers say….

The study is the first to look broadly at the 10-year trend, but the results echo previous studies showing increases in autism, attention problems and other developmental or mental disabilities….

The trend was fueled by increases in attention problems, speech problems, and other mental or developmental disorders that likely include autism, although that condition isn’t identified in the analyzed data.

Some Pennsylvania researchers say childhood disability rates are the highest ever recorded. The study from Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh shows physical disabilities dropped by about 12 percent, but disabilities related to brain development or mental health rose nearly 21 percent, in the past decade.Doctors  from Children’s Hospital studied data from the Centers for Disease Control, gathered between 2001 and 2011, evaluating children’s ability to perform activities at home and school.

Children living in poverty have the highest rates of disability, but the study showed more a 28.4 percent increase in disabilities among kids in higher income families. … “My feeling is the problem has been there, but right now,  maybe in the last ten years, we are more aware of it and we get more help from schools and daycare and it  helps to diagnose this kind of disability,” Dr. Younes explains.

Dr Younes says the biggest increase has been in autism diagnoses, but he’s also seen a rise in the number children with ADHD. He says other brain development and mental health issues have remained steady.

Dr. Younes believes it’s important to now look for the reasons why these disabilities are so prevalent.

Researchers say disadvantaged kids still bear a disproportionate burden and that the increases may partly reflect more awareness and recognition that conditions, including autism, require a specific diagnosis to receive special services. Overall, disabilities of any kind affected 8 percent of children by 2010-2011, compared to close to 7 percent a decade earlier. For children living in poverty, the rate was 10 percent, versus about 6 percent of kids from wealthy families.
The trend was fueled by a spike in attention problems, speech problems, and developmental disorders like autism.

Dr. Kenneth Norwood, a developmental pediatrician in Charlottesville, Virginia, said the developmental disability increases echo what he sees in his medical practice, according to The Blaze (Italics).

“I’m routinely backed up six months for new patients,” said Norwood, chairman of the American Academy of Pediatrics’ Council on Children with Disabilities.

The increases may partly reflect more awareness and recognition that conditions, including autism, require a specific diagnosis to receive special services, the researchers say….

The researchers studied parents’ responses about children from birth through age 17 gathered in government-conducted health surveys from 2000 to 2011. Parents were asked about disabilities including chronic conditions such as hearing or vision problems; bone or muscle ailments; and mental, behavioral or developmental problems that limited kids’ physical abilities or required them to receive early behavioral intervention or special educational services. Nearly 200,000 children were involved.

 
“I’m routinely backed up six months for new patients,” said Norwood, chairman of the American Academy of Pediatrics’ Council on Children with Disabilities.

Norwood thinks there is more awareness of these conditions and that some, including autism, are truly rising in prevalence. Autism is thought to result from genetic flaws interacting with many other factors. Some studies have suggested these may include parents’ age and prenatal infections.

Disability due to any physical condition, such as asthma and breathing conditions, hearing problems, and bone or joint problems, declined by 12% during the decade, while cases related to any neurodevelopmental or mental-health condition, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), learning disabilities or emotional problems, increased by 21%….
 
Autism was not one of the 14 conditions of disability included in the NHIS dataset analyzed because it was established long before autism was widely recognized, Houtrow explains. “But we know from other research that the number of kids with a diagnosis of autism is increasing. We think we are capturing (them) in categories for ‘other developmental problems’ or ‘other mental, emotional and behavior problems,’ or ‘intellectual disabilities.’ “…

According to the most recent CDC report, 1 in 68 kids has been identified with an autism spectrum disorder, up from an estimated 1 in 88 in 2012 and 1 in 150 in 2007, “so most definitely” autism cases are a factor in the trend reported in this study, says Steven Pastyrnak, chief of pediatric psychology at Helen DeVos Children’s Hospital in Grand Rapids, Mich. He was not involved in the new research.

“And for higher socioeconomic-status families, there’s a growing acceptance to seek out help for their child, both at school and at an outpatient setting” for this condition, Pastyrnak says. “That’s why I think you see that increase so significantly.”

The number of children dealing with physical disabilities in the United States has declined by about 12 percent over the past decade. However, throughout the same time frame, the number of children dealing with neurodevelopmental or mental health problems has increased by nearly 21 percent.
A new study that will be published in the September issue of Pediatrics confirmed the findings, showing that in 2011, close to 6 million children in the United States were living with a disability…
Though researchers are not entirely certain what factors are responsible for the increase,  according to Houtrow, less stigma surrounding mental health conditions and more parental awareness regarding their child’s condition could have influenced responses that helped document the findings.

On a similar note, she also found that an increased awareness of autism has likely contributed to the increase.

“Decades ago, a child might have had substantial cognitive disabilities and abnormal behaviors that didn’t get diagnosed as something specific, and now that we’re understanding the neurobiology around autism, more children are being classified that way,” she concluded, according to Medscape..

Over the past half century, the prevalence of childhood disabilities in the United States has been on the rise, possibly due to an increased awareness about these issues. Now a study published in this week’s online issue of Pediatrics suggests the nature of those newly diagnosed disabilities is changing.

Houtrow hopes the study’s findings will open up further investigation into why these trends are happening. The authors concluded that documenting these changes in childhood disabilities is a positive step in developing better prevention methods, and treatments and services for these children.

“I think it’s a call to action,” said Houtrow. “It’s a call to action to the health care system and a call for additional research. And it’s a call to action to parents to be concerned about their child’s development. … Healthy children grow up to be healthy adults. Knowing how to better treat our younger generation is important to this country’s future.”

 

“We know that disabilities have been on the rise for decades,” Houtrow said. Understanding the trends helps practitioners know where and how to better direct services, the study noted….

Significant increases were reported in “other mental, emotional or behavioral problems,” which rose 65 percent, and speech problems and mental retardation, each up 63 percent, Houtrow said.

While ADHD increased 22 percent, according to parent reports, learning disabilities dropped 13 percent, the investigators found….

While there is still some stigma linked with disability, she said, the focus needs to be on understanding a child’s limitation and making plans to overcome it.

“The disability doesn’t just describe the limitation,” she said. “It affects the [child's] interaction with the world.”

Acknowledging it and making a plan, she said, “is better than ignoring it.”

Lead author Amy Houtrow, MD, PhD, MPH, from the Departments of Physical Medicine and Pediatrics, University of Pittsburgh in Pennsylvania, said that although the study was not designed to determine the reasons for the increase, the authors suspect from the parents’ reports that some of the drivers include less stigma associated with mental health conditions, more awareness of disorders by parents and physicians, and more willingness by physicians to diagnose conditions.

Dr. Houtrow told Medscape Medical News that willingness to diagnose may be even greater for advantaged families (those with 2-parent households and higher education and income levels), who may push harder to get services and may be perceived by the physician as more persuasive.

“To get certain services in the school or community, you have to have a diagnosis…. From a parent standpoint, it’s beneficial to get your kid services,” she said.

More Autism Classifications

She added that awareness of autism also likely is contributing to the increase.

“Decades ago, a child might have had substantial cognitive disabilities and abnormal behaviors that didn’t get diagnosed as something specific, and now that we’re understanding the neurobiology around autism, more children are being classified that way,” she said.

Diagnoses of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder are also on the rise, which may be pushing up the numbers because school-related difficulties would qualify children with the disorder under the parameters of disability, she said.

According to the most recent CDC report, 1 in 68 kids has been identified with an autism spectrum disorder, up from an estimated 1 in 88 in 2012 and 1 in 150 in 2007, “so most definitely” autism cases are a factor in the trend reported in this study, says Steven Pastyrnak, chief of pediatric psychology at Helen DeVos Children’s Hospital in Grand Rapids. He was not involved in the new research.

“And for higher socioeconomic-status families, there’s a growing acceptance to seek out help for their child, both at school and at an outpatient setting” for this condition, Pastyrnak says. “That’s why I think you see that increase so significantly.”

The overall increase in childhood disability was found for all age groups and genders and among children of black, white and Hispanic origin.

 The study is the first to look broadly at the 10-year trend but the results echo previous studies showing increases in autism, attention problems and other developmental or mental disabilities. It also has long been known that the disadvantaged are more likely to have chronic health problems and lack of access to good health care, which both can contribute to disabilities.
 
…The trend was fueled by increases in attention problems, speech problems and other mental or developmental disorders that likely include autism although that condition isn’t identified in the analyzed data.
Autism spectrum disorders, now thought to affect one in 68 U.S. children, was not one of the specific developmental disorders that parents could report. “Autism probably would have been listed by the parent as either ‘other developmental problem,’ ‘other mental, emotional or behavioral problem’ or ‘intellectual disability’ (also referred to as mental retardation),” Houtrow said.
Awareness of autism is likely contributing to the increase
Steven Pastyrnak, chief of pediatric psychology at Helen DeVos Children’s Hospital in Grand Rapids, MI, who was not a part of the study, added, “For higher socioeconomic-status families, there’s a growing acceptance to seek out help for their child, both at school and at an outpatient setting…That’s why I think you see that increase so significantly.”
Among those reasons is an increased openness about disabilities and increases in the rates of autism and attention deficit disorder, Houtrow said. The decline in reported physical limitations associated with asthma, a breathing problem related to constriction of the lung vessels, was likely the result of more effective medications that have been marketed to treat the disease, she said. 
 Houtrow said her discovery does not necessarily mean impairments are proliferating more rapidly for higher-income families. Instead, she said, it could reflect better awareness, detection and services for those with easier access to health care. 

Officials are busy pretending to care about what’s happening to our children at the same time they’re adamant that nothing’s wrong.  On the same day as the “first global autism study” was announced showing that there’s been no increase in autism over the last 20 years and adults are affected at the same rate as children, this news is announced. 
 
It’s a 10 year study (2000-2011) involving 200,000 children.  I’m sure it’s intended to look impressive and extensive–meanwhile, it tells us nothing. 
 
It’s about the increase in developmental disorders (21 percent) that’s been found.  We’re told that no one was looking specifically at autism.  WHY?  Because in 2000, when the study began, autism wasn’t such a prominent condition.
 
Over and over we’re told that “more awareness” is behind the rise.  Notice this 21 percent increase is describe as having “slightly increased.”  Autism is talked about without anyone noting that in 2012 it was announced that autism alone had increased 78 percent over the past decade.  No one could explain that either.  No one was worried and no one really cared.

Disabilities among U.S. children have increased slightly, with a bigger rise in mental and developmental problems in those from wealthier families, a 10-year analysis found.The increases may partly reflect more awareness and recognition that conditions, including autism, require a specific diagnosis to receive special services, the researchers say….

The study is the first to look broadly at the 10-year trend, but the results echo previous studies showing increases in autism, attention problems and other developmental or mental disabilities….

The trend was fueled by increases in attention problems, speech problems, and other mental or developmental disorders that likely include autism, although that condition isn’t identified in the analyzed data.

Some Pennsylvania researchers say childhood disability rates are the highest ever recorded. The study from Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh shows physical disabilities dropped by about 12 percent, but disabilities related to brain development or mental health rose nearly 21 percent, in the past decade.Doctors  from Children’s Hospital studied data from the Centers for Disease Control, gathered between 2001 and 2011, evaluating children’s ability to perform activities at home and school.

Children living in poverty have the highest rates of disability, but the study showed more a 28.4 percent increase in disabilities among kids in higher income families. … “My feeling is the problem has been there, but right now,  maybe in the last ten years, we are more aware of it and we get more help from schools and daycare and it  helps to diagnose this kind of disability,” Dr. Younes explains.

Dr Younes says the biggest increase has been in autism diagnoses, but he’s also seen a rise in the number children with ADHD. He says other brain development and mental health issues have remained steady.

Dr. Younes believes it’s important to now look for the reasons why these disabilities are so prevalent.

Researchers say disadvantaged kids still bear a disproportionate burden and that the increases may partly reflect more awareness and recognition that conditions, including autism, require a specific diagnosis to receive special services. Overall, disabilities of any kind affected 8 percent of children by 2010-2011, compared to close to 7 percent a decade earlier. For children living in poverty, the rate was 10 percent, versus about 6 percent of kids from wealthy families.
The trend was fueled by a spike in attention problems, speech problems, and developmental disorders like autism.

Dr. Kenneth Norwood, a developmental pediatrician in Charlottesville, Virginia, said the developmental disability increases echo what he sees in his medical practice, according to The Blaze (Italics).

“I’m routinely backed up six months for new patients,” said Norwood, chairman of the American Academy of Pediatrics’ Council on Children with Disabilities.

The increases may partly reflect more awareness and recognition that conditions, including autism, require a specific diagnosis to receive special services, the researchers say….

The researchers studied parents’ responses about children from birth through age 17 gathered in government-conducted health surveys from 2000 to 2011. Parents were asked about disabilities including chronic conditions such as hearing or vision problems; bone or muscle ailments; and mental, behavioral or developmental problems that limited kids’ physical abilities or required them to receive early behavioral intervention or special educational services. Nearly 200,000 children were involved.

 
“I’m routinely backed up six months for new patients,” said Norwood, chairman of the American Academy of Pediatrics’ Council on Children with Disabilities.

Norwood thinks there is more awareness of these conditions and that some, including autism, are truly rising in prevalence. Autism is thought to result from genetic flaws interacting with many other factors. Some studies have suggested these may include parents’ age and prenatal infections.

Disability due to any physical condition, such as asthma and breathing conditions, hearing problems, and bone or joint problems, declined by 12% during the decade, while cases related to any neurodevelopmental or mental-health condition, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), learning disabilities or emotional problems, increased by 21%….
 
Autism was not one of the 14 conditions of disability included in the NHIS dataset analyzed because it was established long before autism was widely recognized, Houtrow explains. “But we know from other research that the number of kids with a diagnosis of autism is increasing. We think we are capturing (them) in categories for ‘other developmental problems’ or ‘other mental, emotional and behavior problems,’ or ‘intellectual disabilities.’ “…

According to the most recent CDC report, 1 in 68 kids has been identified with an autism spectrum disorder, up from an estimated 1 in 88 in 2012 and 1 in 150 in 2007, “so most definitely” autism cases are a factor in the trend reported in this study, says Steven Pastyrnak, chief of pediatric psychology at Helen DeVos Children’s Hospital in Grand Rapids, Mich. He was not involved in the new research.

“And for higher socioeconomic-status families, there’s a growing acceptance to seek out help for their child, both at school and at an outpatient setting” for this condition, Pastyrnak says. “That’s why I think you see that increase so significantly.”

The number of children dealing with physical disabilities in the United States has declined by about 12 percent over the past decade. However, throughout the same time frame, the number of children dealing with neurodevelopmental or mental health problems has increased by nearly 21 percent.
A new study that will be published in the September issue of Pediatrics confirmed the findings, showing that in 2011, close to 6 million children in the United States were living with a disability…
Though researchers are not entirely certain what factors are responsible for the increase,  according to Houtrow, less stigma surrounding mental health conditions and more parental awareness regarding their child’s condition could have influenced responses that helped document the findings.

On a similar note, she also found that an increased awareness of autism has likely contributed to the increase.

“Decades ago, a child might have had substantial cognitive disabilities and abnormal behaviors that didn’t get diagnosed as something specific, and now that we’re understanding the neurobiology around autism, more children are being classified that way,” she concluded, according to Medscape..

Over the past half century, the prevalence of childhood disabilities in the United States has been on the rise, possibly due to an increased awareness about these issues. Now a study published in this week’s online issue of Pediatrics suggests the nature of those newly diagnosed disabilities is changing.

Houtrow hopes the study’s findings will open up further investigation into why these trends are happening. The authors concluded that documenting these changes in childhood disabilities is a positive step in developing better prevention methods, and treatments and services for these children.

“I think it’s a call to action,” said Houtrow. “It’s a call to action to the health care system and a call for additional research. And it’s a call to action to parents to be concerned about their child’s development. … Healthy children grow up to be healthy adults. Knowing how to better treat our younger generation is important to this country’s future.”

“We know that disabilities have been on the rise for decades,” Houtrow said. Understanding the trends helps practitioners know where and how to better direct services, the study noted….

Significant increases were reported in “other mental, emotional or behavioral problems,” which rose 65 percent, and speech problems and mental retardation, each up 63 percent, Houtrow said.

While ADHD increased 22 percent, according to parent reports, learning disabilities dropped 13 percent, the investigators found….

While there is still some stigma linked with disability, she said, the focus needs to be on understanding a child’s limitation and making plans to overcome it.

“The disability doesn’t just describe the limitation,” she said. “It affects the [child's] interaction with the world.”

Acknowledging it and making a plan, she said, “is better than ignoring it.”

Lead author Amy Houtrow, MD, PhD, MPH, from the Departments of Physical Medicine and Pediatrics, University of Pittsburgh in Pennsylvania, said that although the study was not designed to determine the reasons for the increase, the authors suspect from the parents’ reports that some of the drivers include less stigma associated with mental health conditions, more awareness of disorders by parents and physicians, and more willingness by physicians to diagnose conditions.

Dr. Houtrow told Medscape Medical News that willingness to diagnose may be even greater for advantaged families (those with 2-parent households and higher education and income levels), who may push harder to get services and may be perceived by the physician as more persuasive.

“To get certain services in the school or community, you have to have a diagnosis…. From a parent standpoint, it’s beneficial to get your kid services,” she said.

More Autism Classifications

She added that awareness of autism also likely is contributing to the increase.

“Decades ago, a child might have had substantial cognitive disabilities and abnormal behaviors that didn’t get diagnosed as something specific, and now that we’re understanding the neurobiology around autism, more children are being classified that way,” she said.

Diagnoses of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder are also on the rise, which may be pushing up the numbers because school-related difficulties would qualify children with the disorder under the parameters of disability, she said.

According to the most recent CDC report, 1 in 68 kids has been identified with an autism spectrum disorder, up from an estimated 1 in 88 in 2012 and 1 in 150 in 2007, “so most definitely” autism cases are a factor in the trend reported in this study, says Steven Pastyrnak, chief of pediatric psychology at Helen DeVos Children’s Hospital in Grand Rapids. He was not involved in the new research.

“And for higher socioeconomic-status families, there’s a growing acceptance to seek out help for their child, both at school and at an outpatient setting” for this condition, Pastyrnak says. “That’s why I think you see that increase so significantly.”

The overall increase in childhood disability was found for all age groups and genders and among children of black, white and Hispanic origin.

 The study is the first to look broadly at the 10-year trend but the results echo previous studies showing increases in autism, attention problems and other developmental or mental disabilities. It also has long been known that the disadvantaged are more likely to have chronic health problems and lack of access to good health care, which both can contribute to disabilities.
 
…The trend was fueled by increases in attention problems, speech problems and other mental or developmental disorders that likely include autism although that condition isn’t identified in the analyzed data.
Autism spectrum disorders, now thought to affect one in 68 U.S. children, was not one of the specific developmental disorders that parents could report. “Autism probably would have been listed by the parent as either ‘other developmental problem,’ ‘other mental, emotional or behavioral problem’ or ‘intellectual disability’ (also referred to as mental retardation),” Houtrow said.
Awareness of autism is likely contributing to the increase
Steven Pastyrnak, chief of pediatric psychology at Helen DeVos Children’s Hospital in Grand Rapids, MI, who was not a part of the study, added, “For higher socioeconomic-status families, there’s a growing acceptance to seek out help for their child, both at school and at an outpatient setting…That’s why I think you see that increase so significantly.”
Among those reasons is an increased openness about disabilities and increases in the rates of autism and attention deficit disorder, Houtrow said. The decline in reported physical limitations associated with asthma, a breathing problem related to constriction of the lung vessels, was likely the result of more effective medications that have been marketed to treat the disease, she said. 
 Houtrow said her discovery does not necessarily mean impairments are proliferating more rapidly for higher-income families. Instead, she said, it could reflect better awareness, detection and services for those with easier access to health care. 

**Additional links to Wakefield video on CDC whistleblower

Aug 18


In addition to the stunning video featuring Dr. Andrew Wakefield and Dr. Brian Hooker exposing the criminal cover-up at the CDC, other sources also published the news.  Please note the emphasis on the harm done to African American boys.
A lot of people should be outraged over the damage done and the cover-up.  
August 18, 2014, Press release
 A Study by Focus Autism Foundation Finds: CDC Whistleblower Reveals Widespread Manipulation of Scientific Data
Brian’s new study: Measles-mumps-rubella vaccination timing and autism among young African American boys: a reanalysis of CDC data
 
Aug 18, 2014, Health Impact News
 
Aug 18, 2014, The Liberty Beacon
Aug 18, 2014,  A Shot of Truth
CDC Whistleblower Reveals Widespread Manipulation of Scientific Data and Top-Down Pressure on CDC Scientists to Support the Fraudulent Application of Government Policies on Vaccine Safety
Aug 18, 2014, Focus Autism Scientific advisor to the Focus Autism Foundation, Dr. Brian Hooker, has obtained explosive information about ongoing malfeasance from a whistleblower for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
 

 

 

MDLinx.com: “No rise in autism in 20 years”

Aug 18

A timely study …

Aug 18, 2014,

A world–first study from The University of Queensland (UQ), in collaboration with the University of Leicester, has found no evidence of an increase in autism over the last 20 years. The study, led by Dr Amanda Baxter from UQ’s Queensland Centre for Mental Health Research at the School of Population Health, tracked the global prevalence of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) from 1990 to 2010. Dr Baxter and colleagues found that, despite reports that the rate of ASD diagnosis is increasing, actual prevalence rates have remained steady. The team worked with Professor Terry Brugha, Professor of Psychiatry in the Department of Health Sciences at the University of Leicester. Professor Brugha has been advising the University of Queensland and the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) group on rates of autism in adults and in older life in the general population. Professor Brugha’s ground breaking survey of autism throughout England in adults living in private households and in institutional settings is the only research of its kind to date that provides guidance to scientists and policy advisers on how common autism is after childhood.

First of all, there’s no recognition of autism as a neurodevelopmental disorder with serious concomitant health issues.  Autism is repeatedly referred to as a “mental disorder.”  They only reference the ridiculous Brugha survey “study” from the U.K.
And at the end we’re reassured that there is no link to vaccines and there hasn’t been a real increase.  (Although prenatal exposures may be at fault.)
It’s always good, when the vaccine controversy flairs up, to have the latest “science” disproving a real increase–which lets the ever-expanding vax schedule off the hook.  I’m sure this report will be in the news.
Here’s right from the study….
In 2010 there were an estimated 52 million cases of
ASDs around the world, equating to a population
prevalence of 7.6 per 1000 or one in 132 persons. Once
variable study methods were considered, our model
showed no evidence of a time change in the prevalence
of either autistic disorder or other ASDs.
 Only recently have there been any
studies of ASDs in adult samples (Brugha et al. 2009,
2012). This finding highlights the necessity for epidemiological
studies to continue to investigate ASDs
beyond childhood and assess their prevalence and outcome
over the lifespan….
These results support research findings
(Fombonne, 2008) that suggest that early childhood
factors, for instance vaccinations, have had no observable
effect on the occurrence of ASDs
.

Sharyl Attkisson on Poul Thorsen: ‘Most-wanted fugitive’ and top vaccine researcher….

Aug 18

We can all trust that vaccines are safe because of people like….
Researcher who dispelled vaccine-autism link: “Most-wanted fugitive”
A former Centers for Disease Control (CDC) researcher, best known for his frequently-cited studies dispelling a link between vaccines and autism, is still considered on the lam after allegedly using CDC grants of tax dollars to buy a house and cars for himself. Poul Thorsen, listed as a most-wanted fugitive by the Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General, was discredited in April 2011 when he was indicted on 13 counts of wire fraud and nine counts of money laundering. Some have argued that his alleged fraudulent behavior calls into question the validity of his studies. There is no indication the studies have been retracted to date.

Richmond (VA) Times-Dispatch: “Disabilities in [U.S.] kids rise; not physical problems”

Aug 17

There is more autism, but there’s also more awareness.   One doctor says there is more autism—but blames old parents and PRENATAL EVENTS.  Nothing ever changes in the explanation–no one is ever worried.
Disabilities among U.S. children have increased slightly, with a bigger rise in mental and developmental problems in those from wealthier families, a 10-year analysis found….
The increases may partly reflect more awareness and recognition that conditions, including autism, require a specific diagnosis to receive special services, the researchers say….
The study is the first to look broadly at the 10-year trend but the results echo previous studies showing increases in autism, attention problems and other developmental or mental disabilities….

The developmental disability increases echo what Dr. Kenneth Norwood, a developmental pediatrician in Charlottesville, Virginia sees in his medical practice.

“I’m routinely backed up six months for new patients,” said Norwood, chairman of the American Academy of Pediatrics’ Council on Children with Disabilities.

Norwood thinks there is more awareness of these conditions and that some, including autism, are truly rising in prevalence. Autism is thought to result from genetic flaws interacting with many other factors. Some studies have suggested these may include parents’ age and prenatal infections.

 

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